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The definition of short-pitched bowling could undergo a change

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The Phillip Hughes inquest findings could change the game of cricket in the future.

Bouncer bowling
There should be more discussions around short pitched bowling

The term bouncer could undergo a change following the findings and revelations which emerged from the Phillip Hughes inquest. This came after Simon Taufel, International Cricket Council umpires training manager, informed the inquest that is very difficult to determine how many bumpers were targeted at Hughes during that fateful day.

James Sutherland, the Cricket Australia chief executive, too believed that Taufel's concern needed a discussion between the custodians of the game regarding the definitions of the short-pitched stuff and dangerous bowling.

"The observation of the coroner is there's some ambiguity between the laws of the game and our playing conditions for Sheffield Shield cricket which were specifically under review by the coroner," Sutherland told ABC Radio after the findings were released. "I think that by extension because our Shield playing conditions are virtually a mirror of Test cricket playing conditions there is some relevance to international cricket and therefore the ICC.

Also read: David Warner cried uncontrollably during first net session after Phil Hughes' death, claims Chris Rogers 

"So we'll have a close look at that to understand exactly what that was. His findings come from when Simon Taufel was on the stand and was questioned, and that obviously gives rise to something we will pursue and fix up.

"The extension applies down through the grades and in community cricket. The foundation for how the game's played everywhere are the laws of the game. They're the absolute starting point for everyone, and then each competition has their own playing regulations. In this case for Sheffield Shield cricket we'll obviously review where there are some grey areas and fix it from there."

Sutherland also revealed that any changes would have its implications beyond the Sheffield Shield.

"The extension applies down through the grades and in community cricket," he said.

"The foundation for how the game's played everywhere are the laws of the game. They're the absolute starting point for everyone, and then each competition has their own playing regulations", Sutherland further revealed.

Sutherland also spoke about drawing a line between on-field banter and hurling abuses and that there should be a certain decorum maintained on the field.

"The facts of the matter are, just like on most sporting fields, there's always been a level of banter on the field. Some people interpret that as sledging and under the broad definition it may well be, but what is specifically not acceptable is abusive behaviour in word or in action, threatening behaviour in words or in action, those things are clearly breaches of the code, they are taking sledging to the extreme where it crosses the line and it's not acceptable," he observed.



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