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5 Terrible Quotes in WWE History

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These five groan-inducing quotes have stood the test of time and gained a manner of infamy with fans throughout the years.

In a world of catchphrases, some just don’t come off right!

Every so often a WWE superstar will utter a phrase that will stick with the fans long after their time in a ring has come to an end. From Daniel Bryan to Stone Cold, to The Rock, so on and so forth, it is a great line, quip or quote that helps connect a superstar to the fans and put that superstar over the top.

On the flip side, there are those that are so terrible or had such a negative impact on WWE that their infamy lives on today. 


#1 “Keep it up, my n-----.” – Vince McMahon to John Cena  

LAS VEGAS, NV - JANUARY 08:  WWE Chairman and CEO Vince McMahon speaks at a news conference announcing the WWE Network at the 2014 International CES at the Encore Theater at Wynn Las Vegas on January 8, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The network will launch on February 24, 2014 as the first-ever 24/7 streaming network, offering both scheduled programs and video on demand. The USD 9.99 per month subscription will include access to all 12 live WWE pay-per-view events each year. CES, the world's largest annual consumer technology trade show, runs through January 10 and is expected to feature 3,200 exhibitors showing off their latest products and services to about 150,000 attendees.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
McMahon is known to spew controversy but this might be a bit much!

Where does one begin while explaining why this is terrible? There are multiple levels of terrible that this quote reaches. First of all, even for someone trying to act ‘street’, McMahon does a terrible job and seems patronising. Especially considering this followed McMahon asking the champ “what’s good in the hood?”

Secondly, the quote was made in front of Booker T, who Vince acknowledged while walking off-scene. Booker could only respond with his trademark, “tell me he didn’t just say that,” though it’s likely, that was what he thought at the time.

Lastly, whether it’s being used in a character sense or not, the head of a Fortune 500 company saying things like that, in a pre-president Trump world just doesn’t fly, or shouldn’t fly.

While the term is perfectly acceptable in some circles and facets of entertainment, WWE isn’t one of them, especially considering that a sizeable part of WWE’s audience is under the age of 18. It’s hard to see something like this being acceptable, even during the Attitude Era.

Granted there is the irony of this happening with Booker T in the segment; given his history uttering the n-bomb on Pay Per View. 

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