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6 best exercises for weight loss for senior adults

Exercise is important even for older adults. Image via Pexels/Marcus Aurelius
Exercise is important even for older adults. Image via Pexels/Marcus Aurelius

The transition into senior adulthood comes as a surprise to many. The need to exercise increases as we age, and our bodies age with us. We lose our ability to perform a lot of tasks that we were once able to do.

It’s important to recognize these limitations and, instead of being discouraged by them, make the most of what you do have.

Light-to-moderate work-outs are always recommended for senior citizens once they have crossed 60 in order to keep themselves fit. Exercising in your older years provides lots of benefits, including:

• Maintaining balance

• Maintaining posture

• Retaining flexibility

• Keeping energy levels up

• Relieving stress

• Reducing the risk of osteoporosis

• Reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease

• Regulating blood pressure and sugar levels

• Reducing aches and pains

It is also important to look at the scale as older adults because excessive weight gain can lead to a number of health issues. Weight loss is especially difficult in senior years when the metabolism has begun to slow down. However, it is not impossible.

Strength training in your older years. Image via Pexels/Anna Shvets
Strength training in your older years. Image via Pexels/Anna Shvets

It is recommended to exercise 150 minutes per week for senior exercisers to stay fit. This can include low-intensity steady state (LISS) cardio, with a few days of light strength training to maintain some muscle mass and bone mineral density.


Here are 6 best exercises for senior citizens that can keep them in good health.

Walking

Walking is one of the simplest and most effective ways to lose weight. It is also a low-intensity excercise, which means it doesn’t require too much energy to perform - it is a natural ability of humans. Aiming for 8,000 total steps a day is a good way to start.

Light jogging is also okay. Image via Pexels/cottonbro
Light jogging is also okay. Image via Pexels/cottonbro

Lots of public parks come with a walking track. It might even be a good way to meet like-minded people.

Pilates

Pilates has gained popularity across multiple age groups as a form of low-intensity workout. It is an excellent way to improve balance, breathing, flexibility, strength, and posture.

Swimming

The buoyancy of water lifts some stress off the joints, making it suitable for senior adults. Swimming helps improve endurance, flexibility, and strength.

Other activities that can be performed underwater are:

• Water aerobics

• Aqua Zumba

• Aqua jogging

Cycling

Provided there are sporting appropriate safety gear, cycling is a good option for senior adults. They can cycle on a stationary exercise bike, or take a bicycle out for some fresh air. Cycling improves endurance and strength in the lower body, so it will also improve balance.

Cycling is a good way to burn fat and increase metabolism. Image via Unsplash/Martin Magnemyr
Cycling is a good way to burn fat and increase metabolism. Image via Unsplash/Martin Magnemyr

Bodyweight exercises

Basic calisthenics movements performed regularly can aid not just with weight loss, but also retaining muscle mass, overall strength, and mobility.

Simple, compound movements like squats, inclined push-ups, Australian pull-ups, and core exercises can go a long way in building muscle. This keeps the metabolism running higher and increases the potential to burn fat.

Light weight lifting

The idea that lifting weights is only for young people who want muscles should be eliminated. Strength training is important as we grow older to keep posture upright and the joints flexible.

Moreover, it also improves bone mineral density and reduces the risk of osteoporosis. Strength training is another way to build muscle mass and burn more calories.


Along with exercise, our food preferences may also change as the body starts to reject certain foods, especially those loaded with oil or sugar. The body is at a higher risk of illnesses in our senior years. That being said, it just takes a few small habits each day to keep yourself in top shape, even in your older years.

Poll : Do you think exercising is important in your senior years?

Absolutely.

Not really.

53 votes

Edited by Akshay Saraswat
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