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6 Exercises to Avoid If You Have Coronary Heart Disease

Not all exercises are good for your heart. (Image by Freestocksorg / Pexels)
Not all exercises are good for your heart. (Image by Freestocksorg / Pexels)
Soniya Y

As fitness fanatics, we all have our favorite workouts. But if you suffer from coronary heart disease (CHD), some exercises might be bad for you.

Exercise is an important and crucial factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Despite having a strong exercise routine, you could be at risk of exercising unhealthily.

If you have coronary heart disease, it is important to be cautious when exercising. Of the various forms of heart disease, coronary heart disease may be the most common. It's the leading cause of death in the US, and it claimed nearly 4,62,000 lives in 2007 alone.

If you suffer from CHD, it is of paramount importance that you take care to ensure your fitness regimen doesn't pose a health threat.

Before beginning an exercise program, those with known cardiac problems (such as a past heart attack, bypass surgery, or angioplasty) should consult their doctor.


There are some exercises that you definitely need to avoid if you have coronary heart disease. Six of them are especially dangerous. These are listed below.


#1 Extreme Endurance Exercise

Extreme endurance workouts may be harmful in case of CHD. (Image by Run ffwpu / Pexels)
Extreme endurance workouts may be harmful in case of CHD. (Image by Run ffwpu / Pexels)

One of these types of activities is extreme endurance exercises, for instance, marathons. In extreme endurance activities, there are often long periods of time where the athlete is not able to move at all or can only move very slowly.

This is because the intense physical activity of a marathon can temporarily block blood flow to your heart, which may lead to unstable angina (chest pains). This can sometimes cause a heart attack, which is more likely to happen to people with CHD.


#2 HIIT: High-intensity interval training

HIIT can be difficult for people with CHD conditions. (Image by Pavel Danilyuk / Pexels)
HIIT can be difficult for people with CHD conditions. (Image by Pavel Danilyuk / Pexels)

You've heard it all before: high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is the way to go. It's efficient, it gets results, you only have to work out for 15 minutes.

The problem is that HIIT workouts are difficult. They're supposed to be, obviously, high-intensity, not low. If you have coronary heart disease (CHD) or other heart issues, this type of exercise could be dangerous.

While some people with CHD try HIIT and do great, others experience negative side effects like dizziness or angina.


#3 Swimming

Although its beneficial, swimming can be very risky for you if you have heart conditions. (Image by Todd Quackenbush / Unspalsh)
Although its beneficial, swimming can be very risky for you if you have heart conditions. (Image by Todd Quackenbush / Unspalsh)

While swimming is a great workout, it can put you at risk of heart disease. What's more, swimming can give you a false sense of security that it's not as hard on your body as other cardiovascular exercises.

The thing is, your heart has to work much harder in water compared to when you are out of it. That's because changes to your circulation mean more blood is returning to your heart.

Due to the resistance of the water, your heart needs to work much harder when you begin exercising. The stronger the impacts, the deeper you go.

Because of these factors, you should exercise at a lower intensity than you would do out of the water.


#4 Resistance training

Strenous workouts should be avoided. (Image by Anete Lusina / Pexels)
Strenous workouts should be avoided. (Image by Anete Lusina / Pexels)

Resistance exercises are an important part of any workout routine, but if you have coronary heart disease, they're a no-go.

Folks who have coronary heart disease need to be careful about what kind of workouts they're doing. This is because vigorous exercise has been shown to cause or worsen heart rhythm disturbances, angina (chest pain), or even a heart attack.

If you have coronary artery disease and you're on a beta blocker, make sure you talk to your doctor about how safe it is for you.


#4 Running

Running can put strain on your arteries. (Image by Sporlab / Unsplash)
Running can put strain on your arteries. (Image by Sporlab / Unsplash)

While running is great for your cardiovascular health and is a fantastic way to burn calories, it has its own set of risks.

The vigorous contraction of your heart that occurs during running is pushing your heart a little beyond its limits. Over time, all that beating leads to patches of fibrosis, or scarring.

Because atrial fibrillation causes an increase in bloodflow to the heart muscle itself, it can lead to swelling of the heart and eventually cardiac arrest.


#5 Burpees

Burpees stresses your tendon and puts pressure on heart. (Image by James Barr / Pexels)
Burpees stresses your tendon and puts pressure on heart. (Image by James Barr / Pexels)

We all know that burpees are great for building muscle, but what if you have coronary heart disease?

It turns out that burpees require significant upper-body strength, specifically from your shoulders. Because most of us aren't quite there yet, we do the action with asymmetrical shoulders and bent elbows.

This stresses the tendons and ligaments in your upper body and heart, and can lead to back and shoulder injuries and heart blockage.

If you have coronary heart disease, stick to moves that use less arm movement like push-ups or tricep dips.


#6 Push-ups

Push-ups causes isotonic contractions. (Image by Fortune Vieyra / Unsplash)
Push-ups causes isotonic contractions. (Image by Fortune Vieyra / Unsplash)

When you do a push-up, your body forces your chest muscles to exert more force than they would during normal activities. This is called an isotonic contraction. It causes your blood pressure to rise slightly and puts strain on your heart—which can be especially dangerous for people with cardiac ailments.

If you're just starting out on an exercise routine and want to do some push-ups, check with your doctor first to make sure it's okay.


Takeaways

Moderate exercise is a key component of maintaining good health. It can be especially effective in treatment of chronic diseases like coronary heart disease as it leads to weight loss and a reduction in LDL cholesterol.

Exercise also reduces stress, protects against depression, improves bone health, and increases overall quality of life.


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Q. Do you workout daily for 15 mins?

Yes i workout everday

No; i work only thrice a week

37 votes so far

Edited by Akshay Saraswat

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