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Neil Wagner’s 7/39 leaves West Indies in tatters

Zubair Ahmed
CONTRIBUTOR
News
323   //    01 Dec 2017, 15:09 IST

New Zealand v West Indies - 1st Test: Day 1
Wagner dismantled Windies' batting line-up to put New Zealand in a commanding position

After opting to bowl first on a green deck, New Zealand did not get off to the start they would have wanted, failing to pick a wicket until the 21st over. West Indies’ openers, Kraigg Brathwaite and Kieron Powell looked settled before the former got out. That triggered the collapse as the West Indies batting line-up crumbled, being dismissed for a mere 134 off just 45.4 overs.

The destroyer was none other than Neil Wagner who registered his career-best bowling figures in Tests, securing seven wickets for 39 runs.

39/7 – These are the career-best bowling figures for Wagner in Tests. Moreover, these figures are the 4th best by a New Zealand bowler in a Test innings. In addition to that, he also registered the best bowling figures in Tests in 2017 by a pacer.

5 – Wagner’s 39/7 is the 5th best bowling performance in a Test innings in New Zealand.

0 – No other left-arm pacer has better bowling figures in New Zealand than Wagner’s 39/7.

24 – With seven wickets today, Wagner’s tally of 24 wickets in Tests against West Indies is the most he has against any opposition.

2 – Wagner’s 7/39 are the 2nd best figures by a fast bowler in the opening innings of a Test match in the last 20 years. Only Broad's 8-15 is better.

3 – Wagner’s bowling performance today is the 3rd best at Wellington.

West Indies' collapse and Wagner's destruction:

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59-1 (21.5) - Wagner (caught)

75-2 (26.4)

79-3 (27.4) - Wagner (caught)

80-4 (27.6) - Wagner (caught-behind)

80-5 (29.1) - Wagner (hit-wicket)

97-6 (33.3) - Wagner (caught)

97-7 (33.4) - Wagner (bowled)

104-8 (35)

105-9 (36.3)

134-10 (45.4) – Wagner (caught)

West Indies were shot out for 134 runs, their worst 1st innings score in New Zealand since the 100 they managed in March 1987 at Christchurch. 

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