Brain Tumors Can Cause Symptoms of Forgetfulness and Paranoia, a Recent Case Suggests the Same

A man who thought his wife was cheating was actually suffering from an aggresive type of brain tumour (Image via freepik/kjpargeter)
A man who thought his wife was cheating was actually suffering from an aggressive type of brain tumor (Image via freepik/kjpargeter)

In a strange turn of events, a UK man who accused his wife of cheating, was later diagnosed with a brain tumor. The man, who according to his wife, has been showing symptoms of paranoia and forgetfulness for quite some time, had become extremely distant from her and his family in general.

Talking to SWNS, Gemma, 37, speaking about his husband Andy Hampton, 54, and his uncharacteristic behavior post the birth of their son in May 2022, said:

“Shortly after having Henley, I noticed huge changes in Andy’s personality."

She further added:

"I would ask Andy to change Henley’s [diaper], to which he would say he had a headache and I had to do it."

She initially tried to shirk it off, thinking he was having difficulties with the added responsibilities, but when things became worse, she took him to a doctor who diagnosed him with glioblastoma, a type of aggressive cancerous tumor of the brain.


What Are Some Common Symptoms of Brain Tumors?

Tumors of the brain are capable of causing painful headaches among those who are affected by it (Image via freepik/syarifahbrit)
Tumors of the brain are capable of causing painful headaches among those who are affected by it (Image via freepik/syarifahbrit)

Unfortunately, in most cases, brain tumors do not get detected very easily and only when symptoms worsen, do people opt for a diagnosis based on the visible changes. With that being said, there are some early symptoms you need to keep an eye out for, to be on the safer side.

Some common symptoms of brain tumors include headaches, seizures, unaccounted-for abrupt changes in behavior, hallucinations, dizziness, loss of balance, difficulty hearing, confusion and disorientation, forgetfulness, excessive paranoia, inability to think properly and talk in a meaningful manner, weakness, numbness or partial paralysis, and changes in vision.


What Are Hallucinations and How Are They Related to Brain Tumors?

Tumors of the brain can sometimes cause hallucinations, making them see, hear, touch, smell, and feel things that are not happening in the real world (Image via freepik/master1305)
Tumors of the brain can sometimes cause hallucinations, making them see, hear, touch, smell, and feel things that are not happening in the real world (Image via freepik/master1305)

When explained in simplistic terms, hallucinations are composed of made-up scenarios in one's head that seem extremely real but are not. When someone is hallucinating, they are using all five of their senses, namely sight, smell, taste, touch, and sound, which is why people who experience it find it difficult to make a clear distinction between what is real and what is not.

These visual disturbances usually occur due to chemical reactions in the brain, or due to some other peculiarities in it.

Sometimes, brain tumors are capable of causing hallucinations in people who are affected by them. Tumors that are situated along the optic path or press on it to some extent, are capable of causing visual hallucinations. These are usually believed to be associated with seizures that are very common in these types of tumors.


Some of the common symptoms of brain tumors coincide with those of other known diseases, most commonly with mental health issues. Therefore, when the signs do appear, it is advised that the possibility of a more grave disease is not ruled out immediately and correct diagnosis and treatment is sought at the earliest.

Edited by Susrita Das
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