Menstruation myths and misconceptions

Periods: a monthly reminder of our strength and resilience. (image via Pexels)
Periods: a monthly reminder of our strength and resilience. (image via Pexels)

Menstruation

Menstruation is a natural biological process experienced by people with female reproductive systems, yet it has been shrouded in myths and misconceptions for centuries. These myths and misconceptions have resulted in a lack of understanding and misinformation about periods, leading to stigmatization, shame, and discrimination towards those who menstruate. In this article, we will explore some of the most common myths and misconceptions and provide accurate information to debunk them.

Menstruation is a natural process, let's talk about it. (image via Pexels)
Menstruation is a natural process, let's talk about it. (image via Pexels)

Myth #1: Period blood is dirty

One of the most common misconceptions is that period blood is dirty. In reality, period blood is no different from any other blood in the body. It is a mixture of blood, tissue, and mucus that is shed from the lining of the uterus. The blood may appear darker or thicker than usual, but this does not make it dirty. It is essential to remember that it is a natural bodily function and nothing to be ashamed of.

Myth #2: Menstruation only lasts for a few days

While the average length of a menstrual cycle is 28 days, the duration of the periods can vary from person to person. Some people may experience periods that last for only a few days, while others may have periods that last for a week or longer. It is essential to understand that there is no "normal" duration for a period. What is important is that periods are regular and consistent for each individual.

Myth #3: Women should not exercise during their period

Another common myth is that women should avoid exercise during their period. In reality, exercise can be beneficial during menstruation. It can help alleviate menstrual cramps, improve mood, and reduce stress. There is no evidence to suggest that exercise during menstruation is harmful or should be avoided.

Myth #4: Tampons can get lost inside the body

Some people believe that tampons can get lost inside the body and cause harm. This is not true. The vaginal canal is only a few inches long, and tampons cannot get lost inside the body. It is important to remember to change tampons every 4-8 hours to prevent the risk of toxic shock syndrome (TSS), a rare but potentially life-threatening condition associated with tampon use.

Tampons: easy to use, easy to carry. (image via Pexels)
Tampons: easy to use, easy to carry. (image via Pexels)

Myth #5: PMS is just an excuse for bad behavior

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a real condition that can cause a range of physical and emotional symptoms, such as cramps, bloating, mood swings, and fatigue. PMS is not an excuse for bad behavior, but rather a legitimate medical condition that can impact a person's daily life. It is important to show empathy and support to those experiencing PMS and help them seek appropriate medical treatment if necessary.


Menstruation myths and misconceptions are harmful and contribute to the stigma surrounding periods. It is essential to educate ourselves and others about the facts surrounding menstruation to promote understanding and acceptance. By debunking these myths, we can help create a world where periods are normalized and those who menstruate are not stigmatized or discriminated against.

Edited by Nihal