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The 5 heaviest fighters in UFC history

Scott Newman
SENIOR ANALYST
Top 5 / Top 10
Timeless

Emmanuel Yarbrough fought in the UFC in 1994
Emmanuel Yarbrough fought in the UFC in 1994

Despite today’s UFC Heavyweight division having a cut-off limit of 265lbs – the limit decided back in 2000 when the current Unified Rules were initially introduced by the New Jersey State Athletic Commission to the UFC – the history of the promotion has seen a handful of fighters who weighed in at far heavier weights.

I’m not talking about the likes of Brock Lesnar, Shane Carwin and Mark Hunt who cut weight to make 265lbs. Those guys were undoubtedly behemoths, but even they would’ve been dwarfed in comparison to some of the giants who roamed the Octagon in the Wild West, pre-sanctioning early days of the UFC.

Here are five of the heaviest men to ever set foot in the Octagon – plus one honourable mention.


Honourable Mention: Gan McGee – 290lbs

Gan McGee fought in the UFC
Gan McGee fought in the UFC's only Super-Heavyweight fight

Nicknamed ‘The Giant’, Gan McGee was a former training partner of Chuck Liddell who stood at a massive 6’10”. And while he did compete in the UFC on three occasions in the current Heavyweight division – forcing him to cut to 265lbs – he makes this list because he’s the heaviest man to ever weigh in under the Unified Rules.

How did he manage this? Well, he was part of the only Super-Heavyweight fight in UFC history – against current UFC star Josh Barnett back at UFC 28 in 2000. While Barnett came in at just over 250lbs – a weight that would’ve allowed him into the Heavyweight division – McGee tipped the scales at 290lbs, almost forty pounds heavier than his opponent and way over the 265lbs limit for a regular Heavyweight.

The fight was quite decent, too – McGee used his superior size to bully Barnett in the first round before gassing out and allowing Barnett back into the fight in the second round, eventually winning by TKO.

Despite the fun fight though, the UFC decided to can the Super-Heavyweight class shortly after, probably feeling there was a lack of talent there. To be fair, given the historically thin nature of the Heavyweight division, it was probably the right call.

As for McGee? He went on to a failed UFC title shot against Tim Sylvia, then headed to Japan with PRIDE for a couple of fights before going into semi-retirement. He went 1-1 upon a 2008 comeback and hasn’t fought since.

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