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5 teams that have the highest innings totals against India in Test matches

A closer look at 5 of the biggest scores that have been scored against India in Test cricket.

Top 5 / Top 10 14 Mar 2018, 03:54 IST

India played their first Test match in 1932 and the team took several decades before it became a competitive Test side that could hold its own against the finest sides in the world. The team often conceded huge totals against some of the leading teams and while it happened with greater regularity in the earlier, it did not mean that India stopped conceding big totals over the past three decades or so. In fact, the majority of the record totals that India has conceded has come in the past quarter of a century. So, let's take a look at 5 of the highest innings totals that India has ever conceded in Test cricket in a single inning.

#5 680/8 declared by New Zealand at Wellington, 2014

New Zealand v India - 2nd Test: Day 5
Brendon McCullum showed his class

This particular game should be clubbed with some of the most disappointing results for India overseas due to the position in which they found themselves and then they were thwarted by a record-breaking score by the opposition skipper.

After dismissing New Zealand for 192 in the first innings, India were in control of the game when they made 438. In their 2nd innings, New Zealand were in trouble again as they slumped to 94 for 5 and with a 1st innings deficit of 246 to contend with, it seemed that India were heading for an innings win.

However, New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum then played one of the longest innings in cricket history, spanning 12 hours and 45 minutes and got able support from wicketkeeper BJ Watling and all-rounder Jimmy Neesham.

McCullum made 302, which is the highest individual score in New Zealand's Test history, while both Watling and Neesham scored centuries. The hosts ended up scoring the fifth-highest score by any team against India when they finally declared at 680 for 8.

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