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Australia vs India 2014/15: DRS back in the spotlight after Bhuvneshwar Kumar's controversial dismissal

IANS
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1.91K   //    09 Jan 2015, 16:35 IST
Bhuvneshwar Kumar (R) was controversially dismissed for 30

Sydney, Jan 9 - The absence of the Decision Review System (DRS) may be a talking point in the ongoing Border-Gavaskar Trophy series, but India's continued refusal to use the system was partially vindicated when lower-order batsman Bhuvneshwar Kumar was controversially adjudged out in the fourth Test here on Friday.

Kumar was batting on 30 on the fourth day of the concluding Test when he seemingly edged a delivery from off-spinner Nathan Lyon to first slip at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG). He partnered Ravichandran Ashwin to put up a defiant 65-run eighth-wicket partnership that was frustrating Australia while reducing the first innings deficit margin.

The on-field umpires were unable to determine if the ball bounced before or after it hit the edge of Kumar's bat when Shane Watson latched onto the ball at slip and referred the issue to third umpire Simon Fry.

The Australian umpire flashed the red light to terminate Kumar's budding innings, even though television replays proved to be inconclusive in making a judgement.

Kumar walked back to the pavilion, shaking his head. Even off-spinner Lyon looked surprised while celebrating the wicket.

Without the DRS, the umpires are not allowed to review anything except a catch and a run out, with the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) strongly opposing its use and questioning its efficiency in giving full-proof verdicts.

The stance has backfired several times for the Indian team in the ongoing series, but the incident on Friday certainly endorsed the BCCI's reservations about DRS.

India were bowled out for 475 in the first innings in reply to 572 for seven declared. Australia were 251 for six at stumps on the fourth day.

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