Create
Notifications
New User posted their first comment
Advertisement

Former India batsman Sanjay Manjrekar wants to get rid of free hits in international cricket

Free hits were first introduced for foot-fault no-balls in international cricket
Free hits were first introduced for foot-fault no-balls in international cricket
Bala
ANALYST
Modified 07 Dec 2020
News

Former India batsman Sanjay Manjrekar has said that the International Cricket Council (ICC) should consider getting rid of free hits in limited-overs cricket. He is of the opinion that the lives of the bowlers would be much easier if free hits were discarded from limited-overs cricket.

The batting team is allowed a free hit off the ball subsequent to a no-ball. The batsman cannot be dismissed on a free hit delivery through any mode of dismissal other than the ones applicable on a no-ball.

This makes run out, hitting the ball twice and obstruction of the field the only possible modes of dismissal on a free hit. Additionally, the fielding team cannot change the field for a free hit if the same batsman is on strike.

Manjrekar believes that the bowler is punished excessively for a no-ball since he automatically concedes an extra run, has to bowl an extra delivery and also has no chance of dismissing the batsman on the no-ball.

He believed that providing a free hit in addition to all this made the lives of the bowlers even more miserable.

“The more I watch T20s, more I feel certain that we must get rid of the ‘free hit’. Make bowlers’ lives easier. You are penalised a run, you bowl an extra delivery & you don’t get out on a no ball anyway,” Sanjay Manjrekar tweeted.

Also read: Rishabh Pant has only himself to blame for not being in India's squad

Free hits were initially restricted to only foot-fault no-balls

The concept of a free hit was first introduced in international cricket in 2007. Initially, free hits applied to only foot-fault no-balls. This included both overstepping and cutting the return crease with the back foot.

Advertisement

The ICC changed the laws in 2015 to bring in all the no-balls into the ambit of free hits. Hence, even if the umpire calls a no-ball for a waist-high full toss, or for the bowler breaking the stumps or due to breach of field restrictions or any other reason, the subsequent ball will result in a free hit.

Also read: 'T Natarajan was the only bowler who won hearts'

Published 07 Dec 2020, 14:10 IST
Advertisement
Fetching more content...
App download animated image Get the free App now