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Rahul Gandhi advises politicians to stay out of cricket administration

The 45-year old also implies one should never involve themselves in unsuited issues

Rahul Gandhi watches the 2011 World Cup semi-finals between India and Pakistan in Mohali

Rahul Gandhi ,Congress Vice-President felt that politicians should stay away from cricket administration and other sports as well. Business Standard reported the 45-year old interacting with management students at a leading Business School in Mumbai.

He  replied, “I don't think politicians should be anywhere near the administration of cricket. I think cricket is something that is loved by people of India and should be run by cricketers.”

The scion of the Gandhi family opinionated that one should never get mixed up in things that he does not have an idea about. He stated, “It should be run by people who have experience about cricket. I don't think politicians should be running cricket.”

From cricket, he jumped to the Pathankot issue and argued that the current Modi government made a mess of the entire issue by not handling the situation effectively.

He said, “The best experts on dealing with terrorism, foreign policy are not being consulted. NSA is dealing (with the attack) directly. His job is strategy, not tactics which is the job of NSG. When you let people who don't know what to do, do it, you get into a problem.”

Gandhi also claimed that the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks was dealt firmly by the then UPA government by consulting senior officials who came from suitable backgrounds.

Rahul asserted, “You can't totally prevent terror attacks but you can react in the right way. The main issue is how do we respond. During the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, the then UPA government consulted all senior people. We completely marginalized Pakistan. Now, the way it is being handled is ad hoc.”

According to Gandhi, the biggest problem in India is the centralization of power. Focusing on the matter, Gandhi went on to illustrate his theory against the BJP government.

He implied, “The biggest problem India is facing today is massive centralization of power. Everything is being done by three or four or five-six people. You can't solve problems by centralizing power.”

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