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Video: Visually impaired footballer makes fantastic solo run to score goal

In a match for visually impaired footballers, Yvan Wouandji has been nicknamed the Lionel Messi of blind football

Not many people are aware that there exists a football tournament for the visually impaired. Called Cecifoot in France, it is a growing sport which became an official Paralympic sport in 2004 when the Paralympic Games were held in Athens. It is played by players who are either partially sighted or blind.

In this video in France from April 2015, the blindfolded player Yvan Wouandji scores a fantastic solo goal after beating three defenders with a run from his own half. His close quarter dribbling is a sight to behold as he makes his way up the field towards goal and finishes off with a superb strike that leaves the goalkeeper (the only players who are not blindfolded) stretching but failing to make a save.

What makes it even better is when he makes his way to the supporters after he scores to celebrate with them. 

How is Cecifoot played?

Cecifoot is a sport played by two teams of five players – four outfielders and one goalkeeper. The fields are the size of handball courts with an inflatable railing lining the sides of the pitch to ensure the ball never goes out and so players do not get injured. 

The basic rules are the same as regular football. But the one exception to the rules is that there is no offside rule. 

cecifoot football for blind visually impaired
All outfield players wear a blindfold to make it an equal contest

Since the players have varying degrees of visual impairment, all outfield players have to compulsorily wear a blindfold. Only the goalkeeper does not wear a blindfold.

The football actually contains ball bearings or bells that emit a noise, making it easy for the visually impaired footballers to locate it and play. Behind both goals, a guide yells out instructions, telling the player when to shoot.

Players find their teammates by yelling their names to make them fully aware of where they are. Also, the opponents must yell “I’m here” at the player in possession when he is about to make a tackle – to avoid any unpleasant injuries due to collisions. 

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