Marvel Studios realizes hiring fans to work for them doesn't work as expected

Marvel Studios VP Nate Moore explains why hiring fans to work on their projects may not always be the best approach (Image via Sportskeeda)
Marvel Studios VP Nate Moore explains why hiring fans to work on their projects may not always be the best approach (Image via Sportskeeda)

There has been a growing concern among fans of Marvel movies recently about the declining quality of the films from Marvel studios. Many believe this is because the writers and directors hired to work on these projects lack a deep understanding of the characters and the comics they come from.

The poor performance of recent Marvel films at the box office and fans' criticism of the franchise's direction has fueled this sentiment.

To shed some light on this issue, Nate Moore recently spoke about the company's approach to hiring writers and directors for their projects. Moore is the Vice President of Production and Development at Marvel Studios.

In his interview, Moore explained why hiring fanboys can be problematic. He also highlighted the importance of the Marvel Boot Camp in helping writers and directors get up to speed quickly.


Nate Moore explains Marvel Studios' approach to hiring writers and directors

Marvel Studios' secret to success: Hiring writers and directors based on potential, not just prior knowledge (Image via Getty)
Marvel Studios' secret to success: Hiring writers and directors based on potential, not just prior knowledge (Image via Getty)

Nate Moore has shed some light on the company's approach to hiring writers and directors. Moore, who has been with the Marvel Cinematic Universe since the beginning, has spoken more openly about the hiring process in recent interviews.

According to him, while many talented writers and directors are fans of the comics and have read them their entire lives, Marvel Studios can only sometimes rely on them.

This is why the company has implemented a "Marvel boot camp." At the boot camp, they hire people without prior knowledge of the comics, give them the basics, and then let them develop their concepts.

Fanboys may not always make the best Marvel writers, according to Nate Moore (Image via Getty)
Fanboys may not always make the best Marvel writers, according to Nate Moore (Image via Getty)

Moore believes hiring fanboys to write for Marvel Studios can be problematic. He says that one risks alienating a wider audience while catering too much to the most hardcore fans.

Instead, Marvel Studios prefers writers who don't necessarily come from a fanboy perspective. By doing so, they can ensure that their movies and TV shows appeal to a broader audience.

He said:

"For me, one thing I think is interesting [about Marvel's process], and specifically for writers, I would say, a lot of times we're pitched writers who love Marvel. And to me, that's always a red flag."

He further stated that he doesn't want writers to have a preexisting idea of what the story is since they grew up with a certain issue as the writer ends up recreating the same. Moore noted that he wants someone "who's hard on the material," he wants someone who says, "I think there's a movie here, but maybe we should be looking at it in this way."

Moore's explanation sheds light on why Marvel Studios hires writers and directors without prior knowledge of the comics. The company's approach may seem unconventional, but it has resulted in some of the most successful superhero movies and TV shows ever.


Importance of Marvel Boot Camp

Why Marvel's Boot Camp is a game-changer for writers and directors working on MCU projects (Image via Getty)
Why Marvel's Boot Camp is a game-changer for writers and directors working on MCU projects (Image via Getty)

The Marvel boot camp is a comprehensive training program that prepares writers and directors before they start working on a project. This program is essential as it equips the creators with a thorough understanding of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

They learn about the different characters, backgrounds, motivations, and the universe's overarching themes. This knowledge is crucial as it helps them create a product consistent with the MCU's established rules and values.

The Marvel boot camp also provides creators access to Marvel's creative team, who guide them through development. They receive feedback on their ideas and suggestions for improving their work. This mentorship helps the creators identify and correct mistakes they might have yet to notice.

Following Marvel's approach pays off: The MCU's success is a testament to the importance of the boot camp (Image via Marvel)
Following Marvel's approach pays off: The MCU's success is a testament to the importance of the boot camp (Image via Marvel)

The success of comic book movies that have followed the same approach emphasizes the Marvel boot camp's importance. For instance, Christopher Nolan, who directed The Dark Knight, was not a huge comic book fan.

However, he was a skilled storyteller, and his experience in the film industry helped him create a compelling movie that appealed to a broader audience. Similarly, David S. Goyer, the screenwriter for The Dark Knight, did not like some of the characters he was writing, resulting in a movie that failed to satisfy hardcore fans.

Matt Reeves, the director of The Batman, is a huge Batman fan. His passion for the character has resulted in a movie faithful to the source material while appealing to a broader audience. His approach shows the importance of deeply understanding the character and the universe in which they exist.


Final thoughts

The Marvel formula works, and hiring based on potential and providing training is key to its success (Image via Getty)
The Marvel formula works, and hiring based on potential and providing training is key to its success (Image via Getty)

Nate Moore's explanation for Marvel Studios hiring writers and directors without prior knowledge of the characters is a well-thought-out strategy. By doing so, they can create a product that appeals to a broad audience while catering to dedicated fans.

The Marvel boot camp is an essential tool that helps writers and directors grasp the basics. It ensures they don't make any mistakes that could negatively impact the final product. Some fans may argue that only die-hard fans should be hired to work on Marvel Studios projects.

While the success of the MCU speaks for itself, Marvel Studios has successfully created engaging and dynamic characters and storylines that have captivated audiences worldwide.

It's essential to balance catering to hardcore fans while creating a product that appeals to a vast audience. Moore's explanation clarifies that hiring non-fans is a strategic decision that ultimately helps Marvel Studios achieve this balance.

Quick Links

Edited by Madhur Dave