What does Daredevil: Born Again title mean for the upcoming Disney+ show and how it may differ from the comic storyline

Daredevil: Born Again logo and comic cover (Image via Marvel Studios and Marvel Comics)
Daredevil: Born Again logo and comic cover (Image via Marvel Studios and Marvel Comics)

Marvel Studios blew the roof off of Hall H during the San Diego International Comic-Con (SDCC) when they revealed Daredevil: Born Again for Disney+. With Charlie Cox doing a cameo in Spider-Man: No Way Home and also giving a blink-and-you-miss-it appearance in the trailer of She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, it is definitely a great day to be a Daredevil fan.

With Daredevil: Born Again, we will be seeing the return of Charlie Cox as the Devil of Hell's Kitchen and Vincent D'Onofrio as Kingpin. However, the title might not be a hint at what the story of the upcoming season might be. So, with the announcement of the series, let's take a look at what we can expect and how the show may differ from the story of the actual comic the title is referencing.


What is Daredevil: Born Again stoyline from the comics and why Marvel Studios won't be adapting it for the upcoming series

Comic cover for Born Again (Image via Marvel Comics)
Comic cover for Born Again (Image via Marvel Comics)

Daredevil: Born Again is perhaps one of Daredevil's most iconic storylines. In a way, what The Dark Knight Returns was for Batman, Born Again is for Daredevil, which coincidentally enough, is written by Frank Miller as well.

A story arc that deconstructs Daredevil to his core, the plot here makes our hero question everything about himself. The story pretty much sees Matt's descent into insanity as the Kingpin makes his life a living hell after getting to know who he really is.

Charlie Cox as Daredevil (Image via Marvel Studios)
Charlie Cox as Daredevil (Image via Marvel Studios)

Daredevil: Born Again sees Matt question his stint as the Devil of Hell's Kitchen and also hits on many heavy themes of Catholicism. With him going against his morality of killing someone, the comic sees Matt ponder whether he should kill a supervillain in order to avoid more colatteral damage or not.

It's a lot of heavy stuff which, at its root, is all about the big rivalry between Daredevil and Kingpin. Even the side characters here are morally challenged in many ways, and not one person remains good in this world. But here's why Marvel Studios won't be adapting this particular storyline for Daredevil: Born Again.

A panel from Born Again (Image via Marvel Comics)
A panel from Born Again (Image via Marvel Comics)

Season three of Daredevil on Netflix has already already hit on many story beats of Born Again. In many ways, it was basically a loose adaptation of the comic and featured elements like Matt questioning his religion and his rivalry with Kingpin. The season also featured Bullseye pretending to be Daredevil employed by Kingpin, so his public reputation could be tarnished.

Bullseye in that story took the place of Nuke in the comics, but it still pretty much did its job at hitting many of the story beats from the comics. This is entirely why we won't see Born Again be adapted into the MCU, because then it would basically be a rehash.

Just as it was for Spider-Man in Spider-Man: Homecoming, Born Again can pretty much be a symbolic title seeing as to how Daredevil is returning to live action after a long time with Charlie Cox. In the comics, Homecoming was a storyline that saw Spidey get the Symbiote suit, but the movie used it symbolically with Spider-Man being in the MCU this time around.

We will have to wait and see exactly what we are in store for when Daredevil: Born Again releases with its 18-episodes long season in 2024.

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Edited by Shreya Das