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Australian batsman try helmets with neck safety feature

British manufacturer Masuri earlier this month unveiled the StemGuard - made of honeycomb plastic and foam. It offers additional protection to the exposed back of the head and neck.

Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara sporting the Masuri StemGuard at the World Cup

Hobart, March 12: Australian cricketers on Thursday tried out a new helmet attachment that is designed to protect back of the neck and head. At training, the likes of Steven Smith, Glenn Maxwell and George Bailey all sported the new 'Masuri StemGuard' helmet safety attachment during their net sessions, reports cricket.com.au.

British manufacturer Masuri earlier this month unveiled the StemGuard - made of honeycomb plastic and foam. It offers additional protection to the exposed back of the head and neck.

The step to manufacture such a helmet came after November 27, 2014, when Australia batsman Phillip Hughes, 25, was hit on the back of his head by a bouncer during a domestic match. He succumbed three days later in a hospital.

Choosing of helmets personal decisions: Cricket Australia 

"Our objective for the last three months has been to make available, as quickly as possible, a guard that offers players extra protection for the vulnerable area at the back of the head and neck," Masuri managing director Sam Miller said in a statement last Saturday.

Sri Lanka's left-handed run-machine Kumar Sangakkara and skipper Angelo Mathews both had the attachment during their match against Australia at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Sunday, and the former used it again against Scotland in Hobart on Wednesday.

Cricket Australia executive general manager of Team Performance Pat Howard said: "The players have now been given the guards to trial at training before deciding whether they wear them in match conditions. It is very much a personal decision which we will respect."

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