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5 anti-clockwise circuits in F1 this year 

Track statistics and trivia from the challenging anti-clockwise circuits that test the drivers' fitness, skill and adaptability.

ANALYST
Top 5 / Top 10 28 Apr 2018, 19:12 IST
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The number of anti-clockwise tracks in Formula 1 has risen over the years with the addition of tracks. An anti-clockwise circuit contains more left-hand turns than right-hand ones, placing greater physical demands on the drivers whose bodies, particularly their necks, are more adapted to the lateral g-forces of clockwise circuits.

Suzuk
Suzuka Circuit, Japan

Most of the major European tracks are clockwise: Monza, Spa, Silverstone, Donington, Zandvoort, Nurburgring, etc. Imola (Italy), Istanbul Park (Turkey), Kyalami Circuit (South Africa) and Yeongam Circuit (South Korea) previously featured in the F1 calendar ran anti-clockwise too.

Suzuka (Japan) is one of few circuits in the world to have a figure-of-eight layout, meaning the circuit runs both clockwise and anti-clockwise. Hence, technically, it is not classified as anti-clockwise. The track does not actually intersect with itself, instead the back straight passes over the front section by means of an overpass.

Let's look at the 5 anti-clockwise tracks that are hosting races in 2018.

#5 Baku City Circuit, Azerbaijan

Baku City Circuit, Azerbaijan
Baku City Circuit is the first venue neighboring the Caspian Sea

Length 6.003 km | Turns 20

Lap Record 1:43.441 Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari, 2017

Memorable Race: 2017, won by Daniel Ricciardo (Red Bull-TAG Heuer)

Trivia: The second-longest circuit on the Formula One calendar behind Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium. It is also a street circuit with very long straights, which enables a lot of overtaking opportunities unlike the tracks of Monaco and Singapore.

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