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F1: 4 Reasons why the London Grand Prix isn't a bright idea

rehaan díaz
ANALYST
Top 5 / Top 10
Timeless

A Grand Prix on the streets of London has been long in the pipeline for Liberty Media
A Grand Prix on the streets of London has been long in the pipeline for Liberty Media

You know it is off-season when the rumours of London Grand Prix begin to swirl around. Liberty Media is reportedly actively pushing to include a street race in London.

This eventuality might just come to pass at the cost of the vintage track of Silverstone whose deal runs out in 2019 after the circuit's owners activated a break clause. Originally, the deal was until 2026, but the escalating costs have thrown a spanner in the works.

Red Bull team principal and Brit Christian Horner hopes the circuit that hosted the F1 World Championship's first ever race back in 1950 will continue being on the F1 calendar.

"I think that there's a desire within Liberty to see a street race in London and in an ideal world we'd be fortunate enough to have both – to retain the British Grand Prix and Silverstone and to have a street race in London. But obviously competition on the calendar is extreme. It's difficult to see two British Grands Prix."
Liberty Media is extremely keen on a street race in London, even at the cost of Silverstone
Liberty Media is extremely keen on a street race in London, even at the cost of Silverstone

Here are 4 reasons why a London Grand Prix might not be a bright idea


# 4 Yet another street race is really not needed

Liberty Media chief Chase Carey might be of the opinion that street races are the more successful in crowd involvement and fan activations, but there are enough street races already - Singapore, Baku, Monaco and the new one on the block - Hanoi, Vietnam. Moreover, a second race in the US is imminent.

That would also mostly be a street circuit in Las Vegas surrounding the casinos. While Singapore brings the blitz of the night race and Monaco prestige and history, London really doesn't have a USP for a street race.

While a longer calendar is inevitable, losing a classic track to an experimental street circuit would be risking losing a lot of long-time fans, who are unhappy with a bloated calendar taking the sheen off the racing weekends.

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