Who is Amy Wax? University of Pennsylvania professor sparks controversy after calling India a sh*thole and attacking immigrants  

University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax made controversial about Indian immigrants and African-Americans (Image via University of Pennsylvania and Getty Images)
University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax made controversial about Indian immigrants and African-Americans (Image via University of Pennsylvania and Getty Images)

Amy Wax, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, recently came under fire for making controversial comments about African-Americans and other “non-western” groups, including Indian and Brahmin women.

During a recent appearance on Tucker Carlson Today, the educator claimed that non-Westerners resent Westerners for their achievements and contributions:

“I think there is just a tremendous amount of resentment and shame of non-Western peoples against Western peoples for Western peoples' outsized achievements and contributions. I mean, it's really unbearable.”

She then took a direct dig at African-Americans, stating that they feel similar envy and resentment towards Western people:

“Leaving aside American Blacks, who I think do feel that resentment and shame and envy. I mean it is this unholy brew of sentiments.”
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Wax went on to say that several Asians “hate America” and shared her controversial opinion on Indian women while mocking Indian immigrants:

“Take Brahmin women who come from India, they climb the ladder, they get the best education, we give them every opportunity and they turn around and lead the charge on 'we're racist,' 'we're an awful country,' 'we need reform,' 'our medical system needs reform.”

The professor also called India a “sh*thole country”:

“Well, here's the problem, they're taught that they are better than everybody else because they are Brahmin elites. And yet, on some level their country is a sh*thole, excuse my language. It's not providing them with the opportunities that they feel that they deserve and which in many cases they do deserve.”

A clip documenting Wax’s comments on Indians and African-Americans surfaced on social media and sparked major controversy online, with several people calling her out for her statement.


Twitter reacts to Amy Wax’s remarks on Indians

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The video documenting Amy Wax’s interview with Tucker Carlson was shared by user Nikki McCann Ramirez on Twitter and garnered more than one million views.

In response to the footage, several people took to social media to call out the educator:

As backlash continues to pour in online, it remains to be seen if Wax will respond to the controversy in the days to come.

Meanwhile, the University of Pennsylvania has reportedly said that Wax's comments do not reflect the institution's values or practices.


Everything to know about Amy Wax

Amy Wax is a 69-year-old law professor at the University of Pennsylvania (Image via YouTube/Daily Pennsylvania)
Amy Wax is a 69-year-old law professor at the University of Pennsylvania (Image via YouTube/Daily Pennsylvania)

Amy Wax is an American lawyer, neurologist, academic, and Robert Mundheim Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

She reportedly graduated from Yale University with a degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. She earned her Marshall Scholar in Philosophy, Physiology, and Psychology from Oxford University.

Wax also attended Harvard Medical and Law School before beginning her career as a consulting neurologist. She then completed her legal education at Columbia University and started working at the United States Department of Justice.

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The 69-year-old also taught at the University Of Virginia Law School from 1994 to 2000. Per her official bio, her work primarily revolves around “issues in social welfare law and policy as well as the relationship of the family, the workplace, and labor markets.”

Wax has also published several works in law journals, mainly focusing on “liberal theory and welfare work requirements” and the “economics of federal disability laws.”

She is reportedly working on articles surrounding same-gender marriage, group demographics, family structure, rational choice, disparate impact theory, and the law and neuroscience of deprivation.

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Prior to her current role, Wax also argued 15 cases before the United States Supreme Court in the late 1980s and early 1990s. At the time, she was working as an assistant to the Solicitor General in the Office of the Solicitor General at the U.S. Department of Justice.

The educator’s most recent work was made available in the book Race, Wrongs, and Remedies: Group Justice in the 21st Century. She also received the A. Leo Levin Award for Excellence in an Introductory Course and the Harvey Levin Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence.

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