5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to axe (and 5 that deserved more time)

5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to axe (& 5 that deserved more time)
5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to axe (and 5 that deserved more time) (Image via Shonen Jump)

There have been several Weekly Shonen Jump manga that became global hits over the years, including My Hero Academia, One Piece, and Jujutsu Kaisen. With the overwhelming success of these manga, the magazine established itself as a pillar of the industry.

Within Weekly Shonen Jump, there is an intense competition between new series for the reader's attention. That said, not every manga gets to enjoy a lengthy run, as some promising series can find themselves axed before they even reach their full potential.

With that in mind, let us look at 5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to cut short, and 5 that deserved more time to develop.

Disclaimer: This article reflects opinions that belong solely to the author. Reader's discretion is advised.


5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to cut short

1) Tokyo Wonder Boys

Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to axe - Tokyo Wonder Boys (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga that Shueisha was right to axe - Tokyo Wonder Boys (Image via Shonen Jump)

Tokyo Wonder Boys is a football-themed manga that enjoyed a brief run in Weekly Shonen Jump in 2014 before eventually getting canceled.

Written by Kento Shimoyama, the story revolves around three young talented players trying to revive their high school football team. Despite its charismatic portrayal of the sport and its characters, the manga lacked originality and failed to stand out in the already saturated sports genre.


2) Stealth Symphony

Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Stealth Symphony (Image via Shueisha, Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Stealth Symphony (Image via Shueisha, Shonen Jump)

Created by the author of Durarara!!, Ryohgo Narita, Stealth Symphony follows the adventures of Jig, a young boy bearing an unfortunate curse, in a world filled with mercenaries and magical creatures.

While it did start with a unique premise and a diverse cast, the story soon became a bit too complex and hard to follow. Convoluted plotlines and an overcrowded cast led to its eventual downfall. Readers struggled to remain engaged in the story, thereby resulting in its early cancellation.


3) Red Sprite

Weekly Shonen Jump manga Shueisha was right to cut short - Red Sprite (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga Shueisha was right to cut short - Red Sprite (Image via Shonen Jump)

Written by Tomohiro Yagi, Red Sprite is set in a steampunk world where the protagonists, equipped with electric powers, fight for freedom. It ran for a brief period of 3 months before getting axed.

Although the concept of the manga was relatively original with an imaginative setting, the execution fell short. The narrative had issues like slow pacing and inadequate world-building, which made it difficult for readers to get invested in the plot.


4) Hi-Fi Cluster

Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Hi-Fi Cluster (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Hi-Fi Cluster (Image via Shonen Jump)

Ippei Goto's Hi-Fi Cluster manga is about a world where heroes and villains with downloadable abilities face off in a futuristic Tokyo. It presents a fresh sci-fi concept, as people gain special abilities through barcodes.

That said, the series struggled with underdeveloped characters and an inconsistent plot. Despite showing a lot of promise at first, the premise wasn't enough to compensate for the lack of depth in storytelling.


5) Robot x Laserbeam

Weekly Shonen Jump manga Shueisha was right to axe - Robot x Laserbeam (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga Shueisha was right to axe - Robot x Laserbeam (Image via Shonen Jump)

Created by the mangaka of the popular Kuroko's Basketball series, Tadatoshi Fujimaki, the Robot x Laserbeam series was met with high expectations from the beginning. Unfortunately, it failed to live up to Fujimaki's magnum opus, as it struggled to capture the same level of enthusiasm as its predecessor series.

Despite having a pretty solid foundation, Robot x Laserbeam failed to engage a wide readership and maintain a consistent interest in the sport of golf among the young readers.


5 Weekly Shonen Jump manga that deserved more time

1) Time Paradox Ghostwriter

Weekly Shonen Jump manga that deserved more time - Time Paradox Ghostwriter (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga that deserved more time - Time Paradox Ghostwriter (Image via Shonen Jump)

Kenji Ichima's Time Paradox Ghostwriter comprises only 14 chapters. It narrates the unique story of Teppei Sasaki, a struggling writer who mysteriously receives future issues of the Shonen Jump magazine, which he then uses to create a hit series. It explores the themes of ethics and the pressure on manga artists within the industry.

Even though the series had an original and thought-provoking concept, it was axed before it could fully develop, leaving readers with an unsatisfactory feeling.


2) Phantom Seer

Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Phantom Seer (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Phantom Seer (Image via Shonen Jump)

Running for only 30 chapters, Togo Goto's Phantom Seer is one of the many manga series that could have turned into something epic. The series mainly amassed a fanbase for its compelling cast of characters, intriguing supernatural themes, and stunning artwork.

Unfortunately, it was unexpectedly axed by Shueisha despite its growing fanbase and well-written narrative. Had it been given some more time, there's no doubt that Phantom Seer could have developed into a standout series one day.


3) Bozebeats

Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Bozebeats (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Bozebeats (Image via Shonen Jump)

Ryoji Hirano's Bozebeats is yet another series whose time was cut short by Shueisha. With a plot centered around a young boy named Tamaki who joins a group of exorcists to fight demons, the series managed to combine traditional Japanese folklore with modern action.

Despite having all the elements to create a successful series, Bozebeats was canceled by Shueisha. It couldn't properly establish its world and characters, as it ran for a mere 13 chapters.


4) Mamayuyu

Weekly Shonen Jump manga that deserved a lengthy run - Mamayuyu (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga that deserved a lengthy run - Mamayuyu (Image via Shonen Jump)

Yoshihiko Hayashi's Mamayuyu presents a fresh take on the classic Hero vs Demon Lord trope, as it tells the story of a hero and a demon lord who must work together in a world where their roles are turned upside down.

That said, like many others, Mamayuyu's run was cut short by Shueisha before it could explore its narrative and character arcs in-depth, as it ran for only 29 chapters.


5) Ayashimon

Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Ayashimon (Image via Shonen Jump)
Weekly Shonen Jump manga - Ayashimon (Image via Shonen Jump)

Yuji Kaku's Ayashimon provides a distinctive narrative that blends Japanese folklore with modern crime. The series garnered quite a good amount of following during its 25-chapter run. However, it was canceled by Shueisha.

The story follows the adventures of Maruo Kaido and Urara in a world filled with supernatural yakuza. It certainly had the potential to be a big name in the manga industry one day. As such, its cancellation left several fans wishing it got an opportunity to realize its ambitious narrative.


Final Thoughts

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As evident from the above list, not all manga series get to fully realize their prospects and become global hits. For every blockbuster like Naruto and One Piece, there are numerous other series that face the axe, often undeservedly. This leaves the fanbase with more questions than answers about what could have been.


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