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Australia's Mitchell Starc takes 50th ODI wicket at highest ever strike-rate in nation's history

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4.86K   //    17 Jan 2015, 05:38 IST
Mitchell Starc of Australia smiles after winning the match between Australia and England at Sydney Cricket Ground 

Mitchell Starc raced into Australia’s ODI cricket history with match figures of 4-42 in the first Carlton Mid ODI Tri-Series match against England. On his home turf in Sydney, Starc delivered the perfect inswinger on the first ball of the match to trap his 50th ODI victim, Ian Bell. Two balls later, England lost their second wicket in a similar manner to the Sydney speedster – 0/2 was too big a blow for them to recover from, on Aussie soil and under a new captain.

Australia’s star of the day, has taken a wicket every 25.8 deliveries in one-day matches, and currently has 53 wickets from 29 matches. Shaun Tait and Brett Lee are the only bowlers in Australian history with 50 wickets or more, who have delivered at strike-rates close to Starc’s.

Shaun Tait has 62 ODI wickets at a rate of a wicket every 27.2 balls, and Brett Lee has 380 ODI wickets at a rate of 29.4.

Know my role in the team: Starc

Starc has not been able to cement his place in the Test side, but is one of the most dangerous bowlers in the shorter formats.

“Of recent times I know my one-day game, I know my Twenty20 game,” Starc said.

“I know what I have to do and know my role really well for the team. It comes back to that confidence thing.

“I know my game really well with a white ball and I showed again tonight why I like to take the new ball and why I want to keep playing one-day cricket for Australia and keep doing well.”

Starc has been clocking speeds of 150kmph in the Big Bash League, and has shown convincing proof that he can be Mitchell Johnson’s worthy strike bowling partner for his country in the upcoming World Cup.

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