Create
Notifications
New User posted their first comment
Advertisement

Streamers who broadcasted the Fortnite Galactus live event could get a DMCA notice, warns Twitch

Image via Epic Games
Image via Epic Games
Rishabh B.
ANALYST
Modified 02 Dec 2020
Feature
Advertisement

Recently, it was announced on Twitter that all Twitch streamers who streamed the Fortnite Galactus might get a DMCA notice due to the music used in the event.

Earlier today, Fortnite Chapter 2 - Season 4 came to an end after the Avengers were able to defeat Galactus in the “devourer of worlds” event. It saw Galactus throwing players off the helicarrier when Iron Man came in and gave a jetpack to everyone.

The event lasted merely 15 minutes and ended with Galactus getting destroyed with gamma rays. With innumerable top streamers live on the platform broadcasting the event, Twitch has announced that all of them are under the risk of getting DMCA notice due to the music played during the event.

Fortnite Galactus live event: Streamers could get a DMCA notice

As one might have heard, Twitch has forced hundreds of streamers to delete their VODs from the platform. This is because most streamers inadvertently end up using music that they do not own the copyrights of. The owners in this situation have repeatedly been sending copyright claims to Twitch.

In response, the platform had announced that it would automatically take off the problematic content. However, it did not quite happen the same, as various streamers have received bans in the aftermath of the initial announcement.

Now, it seems that the Fortnite Galactus event is also under scrutiny, as the 15-minute event did include music that streamers don't personally own. As can be seen below, the official Twitch Support Twitter account posted a tweet explaining that streamers who streamed the Fortnite event might be at risk of getting DMCA a notice.

This includes top streamers such as Ninja, Tfue, TimTheTatman, Clix, and a host of other Fortnite streamers, who all wanted to play their part in stopping Galactus from eating the Zero Point. The post also suggested that streamers should download/export their videos and then delete it off Twitch.

Advertisement
Image via Twitch Support, Twitch
Image via Twitch Support, Twitch
Image via Twitch Support, Twitter
Image via Twitch Support, Twitter

Needless to say, most people were not pleased and said that it is Twitch’s responsibility to protect the content creators on the platform.

Image via Twitch Support, Twitter
Image via Twitch Support, Twitter
Advertisement
Image via Twitch Support, Twitter
Image via Twitch Support, Twitter

While the overall situation is surely bizarre, the DMCA scandal might not be “solved” in the coming days. Instead, streamers might have to learn to deal with the new “normal.”

Published 02 Dec 2020, 20:27 IST
Advertisement
Fetching more content...
App download animated image Get the free App now