Which circuit will replace F1 Chinese GP in 2023? 24-race-calendar still unconfirmed

F1 Grand Prix of China
The Chinese GP was canceled during to COVID restriction (Image via F1/China)

With the 2023 F1 Chinese GP canceled, a new spot on the calendar opened up for next season. Fans have speculated on a few locations, but officials have confirmed nothing. There is nearly a four-week gap between the Australian GP and the Azerbaijan GP, so it's safe to assume that a new location will be announced.

The following section speculates which older track could fill the vacancy of the Chinese GP. Note that this list is subjective and non-exhaustive.


The F1 Chinese GP was a unique track, but these replacements could fit

1) Portimao

Why this works

The likeliest of contenders appears to be Portimao, according to reports. The track was decent and gave little issues. It was successfully used in 2020 and 2021, with all good races. It's not the most driver-friendly track and will not be on most F1 drivers' wish lists, but it serves the purpose and makes the cut.

Why this doesn't

The track is not inspiring to fans or drivers as the racing ultimately suffers. This is why the track has not become a permanent fixture despite two visits in the last three years. The general consensus on this track is that it is not favorable.


2) Turkey

Why this works

The track - one of Herman Tilke's best creations - was universally loved by fans and drivers. It was well-used in 2020 and 2021. While the weather halted racing for a while in both seasons, those two outings were still memorable. Turkey fits the bill geographically as the F1 circus will transit through the Eurasian state before Baku for the next race.

Why this doesn't

F1 has not made a significant impact on the Turkish market. Despite the track producing spectacular racing all the time, the absence of fans almost defeats the goal. This is likely a financial concern for F1 and its shareholders.


3) Sepang

Why this works

Sepang used to be a regular fixture on the F1 calendar and has been home to some great moments in the sport's history. The 2012 edition saw Fernando Alonso winning in the rain in an uncompetitive Ferrari. The 2013 edition made the track infamous for the multi-21 incident (featuring Sebastian Vettel, Mark Webber, and Red Bull). Several highlights from this track produced fantastic racing and high entertainment.

Why this doesn't

The sport has had to move on from Sepang due to the lack of revenue generated from the race over the years. Logistics was a concern as costs were rising, and F1 couldn't justify it any longer.


4) Nurburgring/Hockenheim

Why this works

Both Hockenheim and Nurburgring tracks are always ready to race. Additionally, Audi's influence in the sport will increase next season when the manufacturer is expected to buy the 25% stake in Sauber. The automotive giant wants a race to be held in Germany, and F1 could be planning to organize the German GP next year.

Why this doesn't

Germany has, for some reason, not been the most favorable of markets for the sport. It also appears that Portimao and Turkey have been offering a more favorable deal than either of the tracks in Germany. This comes down to regulations and taxes.


5) India

Why this works

The track was surprisingly still in good condition to organize a MotoGP race. It passed the preliminary inspections and is set to host a MotoGP championship race in September next year. With India's geographic proximity to China, the country has become a viable destination as a replacement. Moreover, the potential of tapping into the 1.3 billion population is an enticing prospect, especially since China keeps getting canceled yearly.

Why this doesn't

If F1 decides to go to India, it would prefer a longer lead time than the four months it has now. India's taxation was the most prominent bone of contention when the sport opted to move out of the country. These teething issues do not get resolved quickly, and the sport will need to generate more regional hype before making such a big decision.

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Edited by Srijan Sen