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What happened to Bill Clinton? Former U.S. president admitted to intensive care unit

Former US President Bill Clinton was admitted to a hospital for a urinary tract infection (Image via Getty Images)
Former US President Bill Clinton was admitted to a hospital for a urinary tract infection (Image via Getty Images)
Barsha Roy

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton was reportedly admitted to the University of California Irvine Medical Center on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. He was rushed to the intensive care unit due to a urinary tract infection that had reached his bloodstream.

However, Dr. Alpesh Amin, chairman of medicine at UC Irvine Medical Center, and Dr. Lisa Bardack, primary personal physician of Clinton, told CNN that the former president had been admitted to the ICU for privacy and safety measures but not his health condition:

"He was admitted to the ICU for close monitoring and administered IV antibiotics and fluids. He remains at the hospital for continuous monitoring. After two days of treatment, his white blood cell count is trending down and he is responding to antibiotics well. We hope to have him go home soon."
BREAKING — Bill Clinton has been hospitalized with sepsis. He is currently in the ICU, but antibiotics are working. RT TO WISH FORMER PRESIDENT @BillClinton WELL! https://t.co/TBbOPeXMx9

Meanwhile, Bill Clinton’s spokesperson Angel Urena issued an official statement saying that the president was in “good spirits” and on his way to a complete recovery:

Statement, from me, on President Clinton https://t.co/Jbfl4evpcF

Doctors have also confirmed that 75-year-old Clinton responded well to the treatment; he's already talking to his family and hospital staff. He is likely to be discharged from the hospital soon.


Bill Clinton was attending a private event for the Clinton Foundation in California when he complained about extreme fatigue. He was admitted after tests showed that a urinary tract infection had spread to his bloodstream.

Healthcare professionals have told CNN that urinary infections are common in people over 70 years but easily treatable. The former president was reportedly treated with intravenous antibiotics and will soon be switched to oral medication.


A look into Bill Clinton’s health issues

Bill Clinton has suffered recurring health issues since 2004 (Image via Getty Images)
Bill Clinton has suffered recurring health issues since 2004 (Image via Getty Images)

The former president has suffered from a string of health issues over the years. He had quadruple bypass heart surgery in 2004 as nearly 90 percent of his arteries were blocked. He also continued to suffer from high cholesterol.

In 2010, he had to undergo another surgery to insert two stents in his heart. However, doctors have confirmed that his most recent hospitalization is not related to his cardiac problems. He is currently admitted in hospital due to a urological infection.


More details about former U.S. President Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Prior to his presidential term, he also served as governor of Arkansas and attorney general of Arkansas.

He is a member of the Democratic Party and was considered as the "New Democrat" due to his policies. Clinton had the highest end-of-term approval rating when he left office in 2001, since the term of Franklin Roosevelt.


Clinton's term is often ranked in the top tier of the historical rankings of US presidents. However, he was often subject to criticism due to his personal misconduct.

His infamous affair with Monica Lewinsky led to his impeachment in 1998 but he was later acquitted of the charges, due to less than 67 votes against him from the Senate.


Following the end of his term, the former U.S. president has been involved in humanitarian work and public speaking campaigns.

Bill Clinton has also remained active in politics; endorsing Barack Obama in 2012, and campaigning for his wife, Hilary Clinton’s, presidential campaign in 2008 and 2016, respectively.


Edited by Abu Amjad Khan

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