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5 sons of WWE Superstars who didn't live up to expectations

Not every son of a wrestler can be as successful as Cody Rhodes or Randy Orton.

Having a famous father doesn’t guarantee you anything in WWE, no matter how many people say otherwise.

A lot of people consider pro wrestling a family business. There have been countless tales of fathers and mothers passing on the tradition of the grappling game to their children in the hopes that they’ll surpass their parents.

We have seen this with several wrestlers throughout the decades. Dwayne ‘the Rock’ Johnson was billed as the first-ever third generation wrestler in WWE, and he became a bigger star than both his father and his grandfather. The same holds true for Randy Orton, whose success in WWE has been far greater than anything any other member of his family has accomplished.

Also read: 5 WWE Superstars you might not know were divorced

Bret Hart grew up in a family of wrestlers, and he became the most successful of any of them and managed to escape the ever-looming shadow of his skilled and famous father.

Then there are those children that failed to make their mark. As the saying goes, living up to a standard set by a predecessor is considered ‘having large shoes to fill’. For these five sons, it was simply too difficult for them to live up to the expectations set for them by the careers of their fathers.


#5 Jake Carter/Jesse White

No mask, no real intimidation factor, and he looks like the Miz; how was he supposed to get over?

Jesse White probably had the biggest wrestling boots of them all to fill...literally. His father was Big Van Vader, one of the most famous wrestlers of all time, and a respected legend that demonstrated impressive agility despite his massive frame. The younger White trained with his father at first, before moving to WWE’s developmental territory at the time, Florida Championship Wrestling (FCW). 

Despite winning the FCW Tag Team Championship with Corey Graves, there appeared to be little upward mobility for White. He wasn’t impressing the right people at first, which hindered his chances at getting a top spot when the territory was re-branded NXT, and Triple H took the promotion in a different direction altogether.

White would last in NXT until September 2013, at which point he was released. Shortly after that, he retired from professional wrestling altogether, with a career spanning a total of four years. Meanwhile, his father has managed to continue wrestling, despite his own star power fading into the twilight with each passing year.

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