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WWE responds to major sexist accusations

WWE is garnering heat from all quarters in the bid to get some eyeballs on the Divas division

WWE had a predictable defense in response

Where on one side props are coming WWE’s way regarding the eventual resurgence of the Divas division, major criticism has stemmed over the way creative has booked two recent storylines involving the women.

The two segments in question – Ric Flair kissing Becky Lynch and Rock telling Rusev that he had physical relations with Lana on last week’s RAW – have lead to WWE being accused of being sexist.

An article written by Alex Groot on Vocativ.com called “WWE’s Looming Sexism Problem”, highlights the growing trend in the WWE that potrays the fairer sex in a bad light. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Sadly, such treatment is nothing new for Lana, real name C.J. Perry, who was once positioned in storyline as a strong, confident manager and mouthpiece for Rusev, the “Bulgarian Brute” who tore through much of the roster upon his arrival.  But before long, John Cena was calling her a “ho” and suggesting she performed favors to procure matches, rival Ryback was taunting her about “going all the way” with a fellow competitor, and lead commentator Michael Cole led off an interview by probing into her sexual history.

What do all these characters have in common? They were positioned as babyfaces in their storylines, the good guys that fans were expected to support and cheer for. That, for far too long, has been the strange ethos of the WWE, where women are objects, crude name-calling is to be cheered, and slut-shaming is righteous. Indeed, it is no secret that the company has a checkered, problematic past, not only with women, but with race, homophobia, and taking care of its own employees. The empire Vince McMahon built has a rather retrograde history, much like that of American professional wrestling, more broadly.

In response, WWE issued a statement defending their stance:

“WWE programming, which features fictional characters that cover a range of personalities similar to movies and television shows, tells stories of good versus evil. In addition, as our on-going storylines develop, we will continue to position women as both strong competitors and compelling individuals.”

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