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5 wrestling kids who were rejected by the WWE

While there's a long history of second generation stars in wrestling, not every son or daughter of a wrestling great can cut in WWE.

ANALYST
Top 5 / Top 10 14 Oct 2017, 18:27 IST
81.49K

Not all families enjoy the same inter-generational success as the Rhodes clan.
Not all families enjoy the same inter-generational success as the Rhodes clan

Pro wrestling has a long, celebrated history of second-generation stars. It makes sense for wrestling legacies to succeed. After all, having a parent in the business is likely to inspire some extra interest in the business from the next generation, not to mention some first-hand wisdom and coaching from the father or mother.

Moreover, a second generation wrestler may have a genetic advantage of, if not inheriting athletics or toughness, at the least being better predisposed to the requisite physical size to succeed as a wrestler.

Whether it’s Dusty Rhodes and his sons Dustin and Cody who succeeded in their roles in WWE, or Rocky Johnson and The Rock—a prime example of the son eclipsing the father—we’ve seen our share of wrestling kids who get an opportunity with WWE and succeed to at least a reasonable degree.

Not every second generation wrestler winds up the star of a success story, though. This article takes a look at five high profile wrestling families for which a son or daughter got into wrestling, but was never welcomed onto the WWE main roster.


#5 David Flair and Reid Flair

The apple fell far from the tree when it came to Ric Flair's first child to enter the wrestling business.
The apple fell far from the tree when it came to Ric Flair's first child to enter the wrestling business

David Flair is the son of Ric Flair, one of the greatest wrestlers to ever live. David found himself in an interesting spot with WCW. One could look at him as extremely fortunate to have gotten a chance to perform with the company before he was meaningfully trained.

He was brought in to help build sympathy for his dad and wound up hanging around full time as not only a character but an in-ring performer.

After WWE bought out WCW, they gave David a chance, letting him into their developmental territory. The younger Flair never came along enough to be reintroduced to national television, however. He worked a handful of indies to finish his wrestling career before settling into a career away from the business.

Interestingly, his younger brother Reid looked like a blue chip prospect for WWE before his tragic passing, and it would be younger sister Charlotte who wound up most earnestly carrying forward the Flair family legacy as a star in WWE’s women’s division, and the first woman to win a WWE PPV main event.

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