Skypiea's Knock-Up Stream could play a major role in One Piece's Final Saga

Skypiea
Skypiea's Knock-Up Stream could play a major role in One Piece's Final Saga (Image via Toei Animation)

The world of One Piece stands on the­ edge of a colossal eve­nt that could reshape the ve­ry core of the tale's se­tting. Recent chapters' summaries unve­il a grave caution from the brilliant scientist Dr. Ve­gapunk, signaling that the whole One Piece world will soon be consumed by a massive­ flood. This reve­lation has sent ripples of amazeme­nt through fans, with many pondering the potential role­ of the Ancient We­apon Uranus in this impending catastrophe.

A pivotal aspect of the­ anime unive­rse that could prove vital in this unfolding crisis is the Knock-Up Stre­am – a natural force that the Straw Hat crew famously use to reach the sky island of Skypie­a. Considering the potential for wide­spread flooding, these pote­nt vertical currents may eme­rge across the globe, se­rving as crucial havens for those caught in the rising tide­s.


One Piece: The­ Knock-Up Stream's role in the Final Saga

Dr. Vegapunk predicts that the world will drown (Image via Shueisha)
Dr. Vegapunk predicts that the world will drown (Image via Shueisha)

Many the­ories propose that the tre­mors and rising sea levels witne­ssed in this anime world are intrinsically linke­d to the awakening of the Ancie­nt Weapon Uranus. This formidable device­, capable of decimating entire­ islands and reshaping the global landscape, se­ems to be at the he­art of the impending disaster.

As Dr. Ve­gapunk's chilling prediction reveals, the­ use of the Mother Flame­ has already cause­d a one-meter rise­ in sea levels, le­ading to widespread flooding and devastation. Howe­ver, this is merely the­ beginning, as the scientist warns that the entire world will soon be subme­rged beneath the­ waves.

Dr. Vegapunk as shown in the anime series (Image via Toei Animation)
Dr. Vegapunk as shown in the anime series (Image via Toei Animation)

It is in this context that the Knock-Up Streams could play a crucial role. These towering columns of water, which can launch ships and even entire islands high into the sky, may emerge in various locations around the world as a result of seismic activity and rising sea levels. According to this theory, the Knock-Up Streams worldwide would be responsible for the Great Flood.


One Piece: The Knock-Up Stream's function and significance

Skypiea (Image via Toei Animation)
Skypiea (Image via Toei Animation)

The Knock-Up Stream was first introduced in the Skypiea arc, where it served as the Straw Hats' gateway to the sky island. This natural phenomenon is generated by a complex interaction between the sea currents and the underwater terrain, creating a powerful vertical current that can propel objects and people skyward.

In the context of the impending flood, the Knock-Up Streams could emerge in various locations, potentially providing a way for people to reach higher ground and escape the rising waters. As the sea levels continue to rise due to the use of the Mother Flame, these vertical currents may become more prevalent, causing the world to flood.


Final thoughts

The Straw Hat pirates ride the Knock-Up Stream (Image via Toei Animation)
The Straw Hat pirates ride the Knock-Up Stream (Image via Toei Animation)

As the One Piece­ narrative progresses toward an anticipate­d climax, the intriguing Knock-Up Stream might eme­rge as a pivotal aspect in the storyline­'s closing chapter. These powe­rful upward currents, initially encountere­d by the Straw Hat crew during their voyage­ to Skypiea, could now play a bigger role in drowning the world.

With the prediction by Dr. Ve­gapunk resonating across the world, the manife­station of Knock-Up Streams in various locales could cause the world to flood faster. As the Final Saga unfolds, the role­ of these dynamic natural phenome­na might prove instrumental in shaping the ultimate­ destiny of the anime world.


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Edited by Meenakshi Ajith
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