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8 most unbelievable heists in ODI history

Roy Dilawer
ANALYST
Feature
149.25K   //    Timeless

Cricket is a game of chance, they say. On many occasions, the saying has proved to be true. Though not too often, we have seen a team lose from a winning position due to some marvellous performances by one or two players. The change in the result is so unexpected that one who watched the match for around 90 % of the day, would not believe it unless he watches the highlights again. Below is the list of top 8 such matches where the match shifted its tilt and weighed in the balance of the losing side. They are placed randomly, but number 8 is my all-time favourite and the reason is mentioned therein.

#8 Sri Lanka vs Australia, 22 Feb 2004, Dambulla


This one stands out from the others as it did not involve some big hitting by a batsman or a brilliant wicket-taking spell by a bowler. It changed in just one over. No wicket fell, no major drama, and still the match had flipped dramatically.

Sri Lanka, despite an opening stand of 121 runs and a third wicket partnership of 70, could score only 244 runs. They suffered a major collapse in middle and lower order courtesy of some innocuous bowling by Michael Clarke (5 wickets).

Australia were cruising towards victory after a 148 run partnership for the 2nd wicket despite losing their first wicket without scoring a single run. The Aussies then suffered a mini-collapse and reached 192 for the loss of 5 wickets. Australia required 56 runs in the last ten overs, with Andrew Symonds and the finisher Michael Bevan at the crease. Both played carefully and Australia required just 8 off the final over with two set batsman playing.  

Chaminda Vaas came to bowl the final over. He conceded two singles off the first two balls and then bowled two dot balls to Symond. Another single in the fifth ball of the over meant the Aussies required five to win off the last ball. Bevan struck the ball high in the air, and could only come back for three after Sangakkara dropped the catch at extra cover. Sri Lanka had thus pulled off one of the most silent and unexpected victories in cricket history. 


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Roy Dilawer
ANALYST
A law graduate by education, and a writer by interest and a cricket fan by all means.
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