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Everything players need to know about Minecraft streamer Dream

Dream has become one of the biggest Minecraft streamers out there (Image via Dream on YouTube)
Dream has become one of the biggest Minecraft streamers out there (Image via Dream on YouTube)
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Hannah (Tyler) Dahlberg

Dream is the fastest-growing Minecraft channel today. He's an American YouTuber and streamer known for his speedruns and the survival multiplayer mode.

February 8th, 2014 was when Dream's channel was created. He's been on the platform for an insanely long time, but his content didn't take off until his breakthrough in late 2019.

Dream is renowned as one of the fastest growing channels in history, with him gaining over ten million subscribers in a little over a year. His most popular, and well known, projects are his heavy, plot-based survival-multiplayers, as well as his manhunt series and speedrunning streams.


The history of Dream's channel

Dream has attributed his success to the fact that he studied YouTube’s algorithm (Image via Dream on YouTube)
Dream has attributed his success to the fact that he studied YouTube’s algorithm (Image via Dream on YouTube)

His oldest widely-known video dates back to July 13th, 2014, and is simply a subscriber milestone video titled: "1000 Subs."

Dream’s content has always been Minecraft-related. Even before he began uploading some of his more engaging and well-known Minecraft content, the 21-year-old was doing videos on topics like unsolved mysteries within the game. He was also involved in the process for hunting down Felix “PewDiePie” Kjellberg’s Minecraft world seed.

Dream was collaborating with some creators, who viewers now know and love, years before his online success. Nick “Sapnap” and George “GeorgeNotFound” Davidson are two close friends who he’s been collaborating with for years.

Dream has attributed his success to the fact that he studied YouTube’s algorithm before enacting his own plan to become successful by making online content, saying:

“I worked my a** off learning about YouTube and the algorithm. I studied YouTubers. I made a plan. I studied Reddit.”

September 16th, 2020: Dream hit ten million YouTube subscribers. It was then that he was declared one of the fastest growing channels on the platform. His influx of subscribers was coming to about ten million in just over a year.

These subscribers came from the many projects that Dream has started on his channel. His most well-known being the survival-multiplayer server that he collaborates and streams on with his friends. It is a series where he debunks and breaks down different unsolved mysteries in the game.

Another popular offering from his channel are the challenge videos, such as different survival challenges, speedruns, and manhunt.


Personal life

Dream was quite the athlete while he was in high school (Image via Dream)
Dream was quite the athlete while he was in high school (Image via Dream)

Not much is directly known about Dream’s life. He’s kept his face hidden, despite attempts and teasers towards revealing his visage, and doesn’t reveal much about himself.

August 12th, 1999: Clay, which is supposedly his actual name, was born on this day. Dream grew up with an older and younger sister, and a younger brother. The latter was given the nickname “Drista” by fellow streamer Tommy “TommyInnit” Simons. Her nickname comes from a combination of the words “dream” and “sista.”

Dream was quite the athlete while he was in high school, having been the football team’s quarterback, and also recreationally playing both soccer and basketball.

When he graduated from high school, he didn’t attend college because he felt he knew enough about technology to gain a job without a degree. Before his success online, he formally worked for AppleCare.

He currently lives in Orlando, Florida. Dream has been living, recently, with his long-time friend and fellow creator, Sapnap.


Music career

Dream has released one song so far, Roadtrip (Image via Lego Maestro on YouTube)
Dream has released one song so far, Roadtrip (Image via Lego Maestro on YouTube)

Dream teased fans with a quickly deleted tweet on February 3rd, 2021, saying that he was releasing a song called “Roadtrip ft PmBata” in twenty-four hours. A snippet of the song was uploaded to his private account after the original tweet had been taken down.

Sure enough, the song went live with an official lyric video the next day. “Roadtrip” is reportedly about remembering things from the past, even if they’ve changed now, and holding onto the good memories.

Dream hasn’t since released any more music, but has teased another song, titled “Mask.” There hasn’t been an official release date yet, but fans can expect the song to only feature Dream, as it isn’t a collaboration with other artists.


Controversies

A chart detailing Dream's bartering statistics (Image via Minecraft Speedrunning Team)
A chart detailing Dream's bartering statistics (Image via Minecraft Speedrunning Team)

Dream has, unfortunately, not been spared from his share of controversies over the years. His controversies have gone as such:

MineCon Live 2020

  • A vote was held in which players could decide what mob was to be added in the next Minecraft update.
  • The three options were: the Glow Squid, the Moobloom, and the Iceologer.
  • Dream advocated for fans to choose the Glow Squid. He briefly told fans in a now deleted tweet he would follow them if they showed him proof of their vote.
  • When the Glow Squid won, it led others to believe this was because of Dream’s influence.
  • Dream apologized for this via Twitter.
  • This backlash led to HelenAngel asking if, in the future, community polls should be excluded from future events because of their propensity to cause controversy.

Jawsh Feud

  • Popular YouTuber Jawsh publically expressed his negative feelings towards stan culture via Twitter. He denounced stan culture as unhealthy, immoral, and garbage; even calling those taking part in the culture “unwell mentally.”
  • He stated that he’s tired of people randomly obsessing over creators, such as Dream.
  • His statement received mixed responses, with some agreeing with his stance on stan culture, and others claiming that he was baiting for attention.
  • Dream responded to his original statement with, simply: “You’re an idiot.”
  • This response was carded as immature and criticized for not being more thought out.
  • Jawsh responded with: “Good argument. I am glad that instead of actually making any attempt to prove me wrong that you instead chose to reply with insults. It proves you are as immature as your child viewers and your bandwagoning friends.”
  • This response received equally mixed reception.
  • This was due to the baseless claim that Dream’s friends were bandwagoning him.
  • Dream continues to defend his fans, saying that his stans are “a group of people trying to meet other people with similar interests while expressing this interest through shared morals, love, and creativity.”
  • Hugbox, an ex-Lunch Club member, responded to this, saying: “You are unironically such a f***ing p***y, it’s not even funny.”
  • This response garnered this nonchalant, blunt reply from Dream. “Here I noticed you now go outside.”
  • Dream has since uploaded a video to his second channel explaining his meaning for the word “stan,” and that he sees his stans as overtly enthusiastic and supportive fans. He sees those complaining and trashing stan culture as “more toxic than the stans themselves.”

Speedrun cheating allegations

  • December 11th, 2020 — a video was released on the speedrun.com moderator Geosquare’s channel dedicated to breaking down a statistical analysis paper on Dream’s unusually high mob drop luck.
  • Dream was actually given the benefit of the doubt at the beginning of the investigation
  • Specifically, his ender pearl bartering and blaze rod drops were taken and analyzed.
  • The conclusion was that Dream’s odds were abnormally low (one in a nearly eight trillion chance) and he was most likely using a modified version of the game to manipulate and improve his drop rates.
  • Dream defended his title and denied that the allegations were true.
  • He would post a few responses on social media, including the links to his speedrun world files, and a video rebutting the conclusions.
  • After that, many creators, including AntVenom and Karl Jobst, have made their own analytic videos supporting the moderator’s decision. Dream has respected the conclusions that were drawn, but still believes them to be false.

Edited by Ravi Iyer
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