Top 5 mobs that should be added in Minecraft

A barnacle in the ocean (Image via Minecraft Wiki)
A barnacle in the ocean (Image via Minecraft Wiki)

Minecraft has more than a few mobs and more are added with every single update. The 1.16 update added Hoglins and Piglins, and the 1.17 update added glowsquids, axolotls and goats.

The 1.19 update is poised to add frogs, tadpoles, the Warden and Allay when it releases next week. Subsequent future updates will continue to add mobs, too.

Sometimes, Mojang asks players which mobs they want. They often host Minecraft Live and have a Mob Vote in which three mobs are pitted against each other with the losers being lost forever. Winners, such as phantoms or glowsquids, eventually get into the game.

The mobs that lose are often fan-favorites and many think they, and others, should be added to the game. Here are a few that definitely should be.


5 Minecraft mobs that players would love to see in the game

1) Barnacle

Barnacle lost back in 2017 to Phantom, so the odds of it ever being added to the game are very slim since it has been five years without it. Known as "The Monster of the Ocean Depths," the barnacle was going to make oceans a lot more dangerous. The Minecraft Wiki describes it as:

"A squid-like ocean creature that sucks players down with its tentacle. The mob spawns in the Deep Ocean biome and has a large mouth that it uses to propel itself through the water."

As of now, the ocean is pretty peaceful, so adding this would shake things up a lot. Many players' chief complaint is that there aren't enough challenging mobs. This would rectify that.


2) Fireflies

Fireflies were supposed to be added to the 1.19 update, but were removed due to an issue with them and frogs. Frogs will still be debuting in a few days, but there's no timetable for if or when the night skies will be illuminated with fireflies. Many Minecraft gamers are upset that they're being removed, so this is an easy choice.

Fireflies wouldn't have added much to the game, but they definitely would have made it look cooler, especially in the evenings.


3) Sharks

As with the barnacle, a shark would make the ocean a lot more challenging. The ocean is not necessarily a safe place in the real world, so why should it be in Minecraft? There's no shortage of creative mobs in the game, what with things like blazes, ghasts, glowsquids and Endermen. What the game could use more of are hostile mobs that are real things.

Right now, the closest that players have is a hoglin, which isn't even a real pig. Sharks could easily be the most dangerous mob in the game and make the ocean a much more diverse place.

Unfortunately, this has not been in a Mob Vote and there's no indication that Mojang has ever even considered adding sharks to the game, which makes this wishful thinking at best.


4) Copper Golem

Copper Golem (Image via MrJoshuaT mejoresmodsminecraft)
Copper Golem (Image via MrJoshuaT mejoresmodsminecraft)

As great as Allay will be once The Wild Update goes live, the Copper Golem would have been a nice addition, too. There's currently a lack of things to do with copper. It can be used to craft copper blocks, spyglasses and lightning rods. It would have made copper a much more useful Minecraft block, so it's a shame it had to lose.

Since it lost, it's likely that the mob will never see the light of day again. Just look at the Moobloom or the Great Hunger to see that Mob Vote losers never make it into the game. That doesn't mean players can't hope and wonder about their lost Copper Golem, though.


5) Iceologer

While the competition in the 2021 Mob Vote was pretty stiff, the same cannot be said for 2020. Glowsquids have been a fun addition, but they were not the best choice that year. Perhaps they were better than the moobloom, but not the Iceologer.

The mob would have spawned in the mountains, where very few mobs naturally spawn. It would be hostile and throw snow balls at players. Hostile mobs that spawn in special biomes are rare enough, so it's a real shame the Iceologer lost by a margin of less than 3%.


Note: This article is subjective and reflects the views of the author.