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NBA Finals 2016: 5 things we learned from Cleveland's win

Cleveland came back from being down 3-1 to win the Finals in game 7.

Cleveland Cavaliers
History was made by the Cavs

Much has been said and written about the Cavs’ resilience that helped them rally from 3-1 down to take the NBA Finals in 7 games. Over the course of this off-season, every play, every second of this series is going to be dissected to pieces. LeBron James’ triple double in a slightly subdued offensive game by his own royal standards set this series, Kyrie Irving’s clutch 3 late in the 4th that eventually buried the Warriors, Love’s tenacious defence on Curry, everything that both teams had done, came down to the last 3 minutes of the series.

The finals were tightly contested, but the individual games weren’t as even, with the average victory margin being 26 points in the first three games. The 73-win juggernaut was finally stopped at home, where they had lost only 2 in the regular season. The kid from Akron now called the King led the Finals in all primary stats, and the Cleveland Cavaliers won their first NBA title in franchise history.

Fans who were once burning LeBron’s jerseys are now going to coronate the King for the joy he’s brought to Cleveland and north-eastern Ohio. Here are 5 things we learned from these NBA Finals:

1) Stephen Curry is ‘Super-human’, he can be super AND he can be human 

Stephen curry
Curry was not able to lead the Warriors to another NBA title

Steph Curry needs no superlatives, he is the greatest shooter of all-time, moves with great intent without the ball, has one of the craftiest ball-handling skills, and can sneak in a couple of steals every game.

Little attention to detail on the part of the defence, and he can wreak havoc like no other mortal alive, BUT, and it’s a big but, he still IS human. Curry averaged 30.1 ppg, 5.4 rpg and 6.7 apg through the regular season, a season which saw a unanimous NBA MVP for the first time ever. He also led the league in steals with 2.1 steals a game.

His numbers in the Finals dropped to a very human 22.6 ppg, 4.9 rpg and 3.7 apg though. Sneaky-hands Steph could only manage 0.9 steals a game in the series. He was largely outplayed by Kyrie Irving on both ends of the floor, and the 3 that Kyrie made with the game tied at 89 apiece, was testament to that and largely symbolised the way that match-up ended throughout the series.

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