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South Africa vs New Zealand 2017: 1st Test, Day 2, 5 Talking Points

Twin wickets from Keshav Maharaj made it South Africa's day at Dunedin.

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 09:  Kane Williamson of New Zealand slides over the crease to avoid a run out by Vernon Philander of South Africa during day two of the First Test match between New Zealand and South Africa at University Oval on March 9, 2017 in Dunedin, New Zealand.  (Photo by Dianne Manson/Getty Images)
Williamson was lucky to escape a run-out but remained unbeaten at the end of the day

New Zealand took six South African wickets for 56 runs, including that of centurion, Dean Elgar, to bowl the visitors out for 308. Kane Williamson and Jeet Raval steadied the hosts with a 102-run stand on day 2 of the first Test at Dunedin.

The day see-sawed between the two sides as South Africa crumbled to a lower total than they would have expected to get yesterday but quickly made amends with the early wicket of Tom Latham. New Zealand stormed back into the game with a 102 run stand but Maharaj broke through with the wicket of Raval.

Extra Cover: Williamson closes in on ton as New Zealand impress

Ross Taylor retired hurt with a calf injury to further problems for the Black Caps. The late wicket of Henry Nicholls, caught brilliantly by Hashim Amla off Keshav Maharaj made it South Africa's day. 

Brief Scores: South Africa 308/10 (Elgar 140, Bavuma 64, Boult 4/64, Wagner 3/88); New Zealand 177/3 (Williamson 78, Raval 52, Maharaj 2/57) 

Have a glance at the talking points of the day.


#5 Dean Elgar vs Neil Wagner

The old time school foes once again locked horns but this time for different nations and the battle turned out to be a spectacle for the Dunedin crowd. On Day 1, Elgar had dominated all of the bowlers, including Wagner, in a disciplined performance.

Some crunching pull shots and cover drives were played off Wagner, who was pretty impressive himself. The tireless bowler was even better today as he bowled a marathon 11-over spell in which he removed Elgar with a well-directed short ball.

Boult may have got four wickets at the end of the innings, but Wagner's three was worth its weight in gold. The wicket of Elgar stemmed from a face tickling bouncer that he edged to Watling. The wicket also started a collapse that saw the Proteas lose five wickets for 56 runs.

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